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Saving money is an art form. It’s not just about rock-bottom prices – it’s about avoiding purchases that will cost you in the long run. If you want to really start saving, you’ll need to look at these five instances in which spending less will end up costing you more. 

Cars

A cheap car can seem like a great deal at first. After all, you’re putting less money down and saving on payments. Cheap cars are cheap for a reason, though, and most don’t last. You’ll end up paying more in repairs and, perhaps most importantly, you’ll end up wearing out the car faster. A good car might cost more, but you’ll be able to keep it on the road longer.

Homes

There’s a huge difference in the market between starter homes and luxury homes. While the starter is undoubtedly cheaper, you’re going to have to put in more work. The upgrades and expansions you’ll need to get the most out of it are going to cost you, and most of that money won’t be recouped in a sale. A luxury home, though, will only appreciate in value over time. 

Clothing

You can often find a great shirt for twenty dollars at one store and something that looks almost exactly the same for just five. What’s the difference? In many cases, it’s quality. Cheap clothing cost less, but it falls apart more quickly. If you want to save money, you need to invest in clothing that won’t rip and tear easily and that can stand up to a standard wash cycle. 

Computers

A good computer is an investment. Even if you’re not looking to play high-end games or doing graphic design work, you’ll still likely need to invest a bit into a good machine. There are cheaper machines out there, of course, but they can cost you more over the long run. Not only are they more likely to develop problems because of the quality of parts used, but you’ll have to update them sooner because they are already on the verge of being out-of-date. 

Home Appliances

The key to buying good home appliances is being able to amortize the cost over time. Paying more up front makes sense when paying less will leave you with more costs. Cheaper appliances tend to be more power-hungry and also tend to need more repair work done. If you really want to save, buy something that lasts. The key to saving money isn’t to buy cheap, but to buy well. Do your research and find products that are likely to stand up to the ravages of time. Doing so will let you save money because you won’t have to worry about buying new quite as often.


Meghan Belnap is a freelance writer who enjoys spending time with her family. She loves being in the outdoors and exploring new opportunities whenever they arise. Meghan finds happiness in researching new topics that help to expand her horizons. You can often find her buried in a good book or out looking for an adventure. You can connect with her on Facebook right here and Twitter right here.

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Posted in: Taxes