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Social Security Professor

Located in United States.
by on November 11, 2021
Every year on Veterans Day, we honor the people who risk their lives to protect our country. Our disability program is part of our obligation to wounded warriors and their families. Social Security is an important resource for military members who return home with injuries. If you know a wounded veteran, please let them know about our Wounded Warriors webpage. Our Wounded Warriors webpage answers many questions commonly asked about Social Security and shares useful information about disability benefits. On this page, you can learn how Social Security benefits are different from benefits available through the Department of Veterans Affairs and require a separate application. We also explain how veterans can expedite the processing of their Social Security disability claims if they become disabled while on active military service on or after October 1, 2001, regardless of where the disability occurs. Active duty military service members who continue to receive pay while in a hospital or on medical leave should consider applying for disability benefits if they’re unable to work due to a disabling condition. Active-duty status and receipt of military pay doesn’t necessarily prevent payment of Social Security disability benefits. We honor veterans and active-duty members of the military every day by giving them the respect they deserve. Please let these heroes know they can count on us when they need us most. They’ve earned these benefits! Our webpages are easy to share on social media and by email with your friends and family. Please consider passing this information along to someone who may need it. By Dawn Bystry, Deputy Associate Commissioner, Office of Strategic and Digital Communications Source
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by on October 25, 2021
SourceEveryone’s retirement is unique. Beyond deciding when to begin receiving retirement benefits, other factors that can affect your benefits include whether you continue to work, what type of job you had, and if you have a pension from certain jobs. Continuing To Work You can choose to keep working beyond your full retirement age. If you do, you can increase your future Social Security benefits. Each extra year you work adds another year of earnings to your Social Security record. Higher lifetime earnings can mean higher benefits when you choose to receive benefits. Specific Types Of Earnings While Social Security earnings are calculated the same way for most American workers, there are some types of earnings that have additional rules. Earning types with special rules include: Farm Work Federal Government Employment Household Employment Military Service Nonprofit Or Religious Organizations Railroad Earnings Self-Employment State And Local Government Employment Wages Work Outside The United States Pensions And Other Factors Pensions and taxes have the potential to impact your retirement benefit. Review the resources below on pensions and other factors you should consider: Windfall Elimination Provision (WEP): If you have a pension from a job for which you didn’t pay Social Security taxes, this policy may lower your retirement benefits. Government Pension Offset (GPO): This policy affects benefits as a spouse, widow, or widower if you have a pension from a government job for which you didn’t pay Social Security taxes. Income Taxes And Your Social Security Benefits: You might have to pay federal income taxes on your Social Security benefits in certain situations.  
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by on October 13, 2021
Approximately 70 million Americans will see a 5.9% increase in their Social Security benefits and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payments in 2022. Federal benefit rates increase when the cost-of-living rises, as measured by the Department of Labor’s Consumer Price Index (CPI-W). The CPI-W rises when inflation increases, leading to a higher cost-of-living. This change means prices for goods and services, on average, are a little more expensive, so the cost-of-living adjustment (COLA) helps to offset these costs. We will mail COLA notices throughout the month of December to retirement, survivors, and disability beneficiaries, SSI recipients, and representative payees. But, if you want to know your new benefit amount sooner, you can securely obtain your Social Security COLA notice online using the Message Center in your my Social Security account. You can access this information in early December prior to the mailed notice. If you prefer to access your COLA notice online and not receive the mailed notice, you can log in to your personal my Social Security account to opt out of a mailed COLA notice and any other notices that are available online by updating your Preferences in the Message Center. Did you know you can receive a text or email alert when there is a new message waiting for you? That way, you always know when we have something important for you – like your COLA notice. If you don’t have an account yet, you must create one by November 17, 2021, to receive the 2022 COLA notice online. January 2022 marks other changes that will happen based on the increase in the national average wage index. For example, the maximum amount of earnings subject to Social Security payroll tax in 2022 will be higher. The retirement earnings test exempt amount will also change in 2022. Be among the first to know! Sign up for or log in to your personal my Social Security account today. Choose email or text under “Message Center Preferences” to receive courtesy notifications. You can find more information about the 2022 COLA here. By Darlynda Bogle, Acting Deputy Commissioner for Communications Source FICA wage base - $147,000 Earned Income to obtain one credit - $1,510 Earnings test - $19,560 ($1,630 monthly amount) Earnings test (year of attaining FRA) - $51,960 ($4,330 monthly amount) Average retirement benefit - $1,657 SSA Fact Sheet - https://www.ssa.gov/news/press/factsheets/colafacts2022.pdf
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by on October 9, 2021
We redesigned the Social Security Statement (Statement) to make it easier for people to find the information they need to plan their financial future. The Statement is one of the most effective tools a person can use to learn about their earnings and future Social Security benefits.   Some of the highlights of the new Statement are: It’s much shorter and easier to read. A bar chart displays the person’s estimated retirement benefits for up to nine retirement start dates. Text boxes emphasize key facts people need for financial planning.   We also provide, fact sheets tailored to a person’s age group and earnings situation with the Statement. For example, we provide more information to younger workers about how to save for the future. For older workers, we explain how benefits may be taxed and how to avoid a Medicare penalty. Visit our Statement page to see samples of the redesigned Statement and the fact sheets (in English and Spanish). Source
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by on October 6, 2021
If you’re getting Social Security retirement benefits, some members of your family may also qualify to receive benefits on your record. If they qualify, your ex-spouse, spouse, or child may receive a monthly payment of up to one-half of your retirement benefit amount. These Social Security payments to family members will not decrease the amount of your retirement benefit. Maximum Family Benefits There is a limit to the amount we can pay your family. The total varies, depending on your benefit amount and the number of qualifying family members on your record. Generally, the total amount you and your family can receive is about 150 to 180 percent of your full retirement benefit. If you have a divorced spouse who qualifies for benefits, it will not affect the amount of benefits you or your family may receive. Benefits For Your Spouse Even if they have never worked under Social Security, your spouse may be eligible for benefits if they are at least 62 years of age and you are receiving retirement or disability benefits. Your spouse can also qualify for Medicare at age 65. How Much Will My Spouse Receive? If your spouse qualifies for benefits on their own record, we will pay that amount first. If the benefit on your record is higher, they will get an additional amount on your record so that the combination of benefits equals that higher amount. The benefits for your spouse do not include any delayed retirement credits you may receive. If they begin receiving benefits: Between age 62 and their full retirement age, the amount is permanently reduced by a percentage based on the number of months up to their full retirement age. If your spouse is under full retirement age and: Work while receiving benefits, the retirement earnings test may affect their benefits. Also qualifies on their own record, their application will include both benefits. At their full retirement age, the spouse’s benefit cannot exceed one-half of your full retirement amount. If your spouse was born before January 2, 1954, and has already reached full retirement age, they can choose to receive only the spouse's benefit and delay receiving their own retirement benefit until a later date. If your spouse is full retirement age and applying for spouse’s benefits only, they can apply online by using the retirement application. If your spouse’s birthday is January 2, 1954 or later, the option to take only one benefit at full retirement age no longer exists. If your spouse files for one benefit, they will be effectively filing for all retirement or spousal benefits. If your spouse will receive a pension for work not covered by Social Security such as government employment, the amount of their Social Security benefits on your record may be reduced. Your spouse can also receive spouse's benefits at any age if they are caring for your child under age 16 or who became disabled before age 22, and is entitled to benefits. Benefits paid to your spouse will not decrease your retirement benefit. In fact, the value of the benefits they may receive, added to your own, may help you decide if taking your benefits sooner may be more advantageous. Benefits For Your Children When you qualify for Social Security retirement benefits, your children may also qualify to receive benefits on your record. Your eligible child can be your biological child, adopted child, or stepchild. A dependent grandchild may also qualify. To receive benefits, the child must: Be unmarried. Be under age 18. Be 18-19 years old and a full-time student (no higher than grade 12). Be 18 or older and disabled from a disability that started before age 22. Benefits stop when children reach age 18 unless they are disabled. However, if the child is still a full-time student at a secondary (or elementary) school at age 18, benefits will continue until the child graduates or until two months after the child becomes age 19, whichever is first. Benefits paid for your child will not decrease your retirement benefit. In fact, the value of the benefits they may receive, added to your own, may help you decide if taking your benefits sooner may be more advantageous. If Your Child Works If a child on your record works while receiving benefits, the same earnings limits apply to them as apply to you. If your child is eligible for benefits this year and is also working, you can use our Retirement Earnings Test Calculator to see how those earnings would affect the child's benefit payments. Your child's earnings affect only their own benefits. They do not affect your benefits or those of any other beneficiaries on your record. Benefits For Your Divorced Spouse If you are divorced, your ex-spouse can receive benefits based on your record (even if you have remarried) if: Your marriage lasted 10 years or longer. Your ex-spouse is unmarried. Your ex-spouse is age 62 or older. The benefit that your ex-spouse is entitled to receive based on their own work is less than the benefit they would receive based on your work. You are entitled to Social Security retirement or disability benefits. How Much Will Your Divorced Spouse Receive If you have not applied for retirement benefits, but can qualify for them, your ex-spouse can receive benefits on your record if you have been divorced for at least two continuous years. If your ex-spouse is eligible for retirement benefits on their own record, we will pay that amount first. If the benefit on your record is higher, they will get an additional amount on your record so that the combination of benefits equals that higher amount. If your ex-spouse was born before January 2, 1954, and has already reached full retirement age, they can choose to receive only the divorced spouse’s benefit and delay receiving their own retirement benefit until a later date. If your ex-spouse’s birthday is January 2, 1954 or later, the option to take only one benefit at full retirement age no longer exists. If your ex-spouse files for one benefit, they will be effectively filing for all retirement or spousal benefits. If Your Ex-Spouse Works If your ex-spouse continues to work while receiving benefits, the same earnings limits apply to them as apply to you. If your ex-spouse is eligible for benefits this year and is also working, you can use our retirement earnings test calculator to see how those earnings would affect those benefit payments. If your ex-spouse will also receive a pension based on work not covered by Social Security, such as government work, their Social Security benefit on your record may be affected. The amount of benefits your divorced spouse gets has no effect on the amount of benefits you or your current spouse may receive. If You Remarry If you remarry, your ex-spouse will still be eligible for benefits if they meet the requirements. If your former spouse is deceased and you need information about possible survivors benefits, please read, Surviving Divorced Spouse. How Do You Apply? You can apply online by using our Social Security Retirement/Medicare Benefit Application to apply for retirement, spouse's, divorced spouse's or Medicare benefits. If you and your spouse apply online for retirement benefits at the same time, or if your spouse applies online after you start receiving benefits, we will check their eligibility for benefits as a spouse. If they are qualified, the online application will automatically include a request for spousal benefits on your record. If your spouse applies for benefits, they need to be ready to supply the information we need to approve their application for these benefits: Information You Need To Apply For Retirement Benefits Or Medicare. Information You Need to Apply for Spouse's or Divorced Spouse's Benefits. Source
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by on July 29, 2021
Social Security is here to help millions of people secure today and tomorrow by providing benefits and financial protection. We continue to protect the integrity of our disability programs by ensuring we make the correct decision on each claim. However, if you disagree with our decision on your claim, you can ask us to review your case by filing an appeal. How can I appeal Social Security’s decision on my claim? Generally, there are four appeal levels. If you are not satisfied with the decision at one level, you may appeal to the next. The appeal levels are: Reconsideration: A reconsideration is a complete review of your claim by someone who did not take part in the first decision. We will look at all the evidence submitted in the original determination, and any new evidence. Hearing: If you disagree with the decision we made at the reconsideration level, you may ask for a hearing. An administrative law judge, who had no part in the original decision or the reconsideration of your case, conducts the hearing. Appeals Council Review: If you disagree with the hearing decision, you can request a review by Social Security’s Appeals Council. The Appeals Council looks at all requests for review and can either make a decision on your case or return your case to the judge for further review. Federal Court Review: If you disagree with the Appeals Council’s decision or if the Appeals Council decides not to review your case, you can file a lawsuit in a federal district court as the last level in the appeals process. Please visit our Appeal A Decision web page for more information. When should I file my appeal? If we denied your claim, you have 60 days from the date of the notice to file an appeal. The easiest and quickest way is to file your appeal request online, where you can submit associated documents electronically. You can also call your local Social Security office or 1-800-772-1213 to obtain the forms. Do I need a representative to file an appeal? Whether you choose to appoint an attorney or authorized representative is completely up to you. You may choose to have someone help you with your appeal or represent you. Your representative may be a lawyer or other qualified person familiar with you and the Social Security program. We will work with your representative just as we would work with you. They can act for you in most Social Security matters, and they will receive a copy of any decisions we make about your claim. If you need us to review your case, please go online or call 1-800-772-1213. By Dawn Bystry, Deputy Associate Commissioner, Office of Strategic and Digital Communications
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by on March 11, 2021
The National Institute on Aging (NIA), part of the National Institutes of Health, conducts and supports scientific research to help more people live healthy, active lives as they grow older. NIA offers the following resources to support older adults, their families, and caregivers:   Information on maintaining health and function as you age. You can read NIA’s health information online or order free print publications for yourself, your loved ones, or your organization. Many health information pages and publications are also available in Spanish. Health information and research news about Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias. As the primary federal agency for research on these diseases, NIA oversees the website Alzheimers.gov. The website provides information in both English and Spanish for people living with these devastating diseases—and for their families and caregivers. Clinical trial information and resources for people living with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias, their caregivers, and healthy individuals. NIA offers in-depth information on participating in clinical trials and can help you find one convenient to you. You can contact NIA’s information resource centers by phone or email to learn about healthy aging, Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias, services in your community, and clinical trials. You can also explore NIA’s website for timely information such as federal resources to support older adults during the COVID-19 pandemic. When you sign up for NIA’s emails, we can receive weekly tips on healthy aging and caregiving—and updates about clinical trials, scientific research, and research funding opportunities. You can also follow NIA on Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube. By Jordan Broderick, Public Affairs Specialist, National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health
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